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At the Atrium Health Musculoskeletal Institute, we’re here to help you live your best life. From socket problems to problems with getting dressed or undressed, our Osseointegration Program can make it easier to use your prosthesis. Our osseointegration experts offer surgery to attach an artificial limb directly to your bone. And we’re one of few programs in the country that provide above the knee osseointegration.

With the aid of our experts, which include board-certified orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists and nutritionists, you’ll be back to doing the activities you love.

You’re a good candidate for osseointegration if:

  • You experience problems with your socket (perspiration, skin problems, pain)
  • Your walking distance is limited because of your socket
  • You can’t sit comfortably with your socket
  • You often lose your prosthesis during daily activities
  • You have back pain because you limp while you walk or find it hard to stand or sit straight

For more information, or to refer a patient, contact Amber Stanley, Patient Navigator.

Patient Care – What to Expect from Atrium Health

A team of an orthopaedic surgeon, physical therapist and prosthetist will determine if you are a candidate for the OPRA Implant System. The decision is based on clinical examination, radiographic examination, and your amputation status. The radiographic evaluation includes x-rays to determine bone quality, make measurements and look for any abnormalities, as well as CT scans to determine the correct Fixture length and to verify thigh bone length.

At your first appointment, you can also expect the following:

  • A socket evaluation
  • To review prosthetic history and current challenges
  • To discuss history of prosthetic use and activities
  • To review current prosthetic componentry
  • To discuss osseointegration (OI) protocol
  • To discuss role of OI team prosthetist

A patient navigator will guide you through the OI Program and will be available to answer any questions you may have along the way.

Meet the Multidisciplinary Team

Joseph R. Hsu

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Joseph R. Hsu

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Doug M. Thommen

Physiatrist

Doug M. Thommen

Physiatrist

Deborah Cordell

Therapist

Deborah Cordell

Therapist

Amber Stanley

Patient Coordinator

Amber Stanley

Patient Coordinator

Rachel B. Seymour

Professor and Vice Chair for Research

Rachel B. Seymour

Professor and Vice Chair for Research

Christine Churchill

Research Manager

Christine Churchill

Research Manager

Erica Grochowski

Research Associate

Erica Grochowski

Research Associate

FAQ

We can help patients who have an amputation either above the elbow or knee and have difficulty wearing a prosthesis.

The metal implant is put into the bone during the first stage of surgery. The wound is closed, and the bone will heal directly to the metal implant.

During the second stage, a small cut, or incision, is made in the skin to attach the prosthetic device to the implant. This incision site is called a stoma.

Afterward, you will be monitored while you heal. It is important to know that the prosthetic limb can be changed from time to time. This means that if it becomes damaged or if the patient develops an infection around the implant, the device can be adjusted.

A team of experts work with you after surgery with physical therapy and nutritional guidance. We also offer support for any stress or emotions you may be feeling.

The most common risk of osseointegration is a skin infection around the area of the incision. The infection is treated with increased cleaning and antibiotics. Sometimes the infection is deeper and spreads to the muscles and tissues. This can also be treated with antibiotics.

Other risks can be with the metal implant or prosthetic limb. These risks include pain or fractures to the bone. Several treatment options are available for these conditions.

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